Review: Million Miles More by FabricationsHQ

View original review here.

Million Miles More has a musical tone, song craft and sound not dissimilar to the original ‘black and white’ era of Blue Öyster Cult and the original Alice Cooper (group) releases.

But then it would.

Blue Coupe is the part supergroup part power-trio formed from the talents of Albert Bouchard (vocals, drums), Joe Bouchard (vocals, guitars, keyboards) and Dennis Dunaway (bass/ vocals).

As every rock fan and his Aunty knows, the Bouchard brothers were co-founders and original rhythm section of Blue Öyster Cult.
They also featured as lead vocalists once or twice per BÖC album.

Albert and Joe Bouchard co-wrote or wrote many of Blue Öyster Cult's best known tracks until their respective 1981 and 1986 departures from the band.

Dennis Dunaway was an integral component of the original Alice Cooper group and the classic, early 70’s albums, co-writing many of the hits including ‘I’m Eighteen’ and ‘Under My Wheels.’

Blue Coupe originally got together to play the New York circuit with a set-list based around the Blue Öyster Cult and Cooper classics (hence their name).
However their creative chemistry resulted in an album of all new material in 2010, Tornado on the Tracks.
The debut album had multiple Grammy considerations and featured Robby Krieger on one of the best songs BÖC never did, ‘Angel’s Well.’

But Million Miles More is a decidedly stronger offering than the debut.

Kicking off with the beat-driven rock of the excellent ‘Prophets, Dukes and Nomads,’ the band then give a nod to their musical past with the rollicking roll of ‘Hellfire Hurry’ (featuring great six-string lead bursts from BÖC's Buck Dharma) before Alice Cooper guests on lead vocals for the sinister fun of ‘Hallows Grave.’

But it isn’t all up-tempo guitar-bass-drums rock and roll.
‘I’ll Forever Stick Around,’ the piano and strings ballad featuring a rare Dennis Dunaway lead vocal, has a charm unlike any other song on the album; then there’s the slow-tempo pseudo blues of ‘Train of Thought.’

But at its heart Million Miles More is a rock and roll record, and a rather good one, with other highlights including the eerie rock and roll of ‘Modern Love (Stalking Time)’, featuring original Steppenwolf keyboard player Goldy McJohn, and the shout-it-out chorus and punch of ‘Ain’t Dead’ with lead guitar from ex Manowar and The Dictators guitarist Ross The Boss.

The single that preceded the album’s release, ‘More Cowbell (Gotta Fever)’ has been added as a special bonus track, but the crowd-shout number works far better in the live environment (where it was originally recorded).

Joe Bouchard, Albert Bouchard and Dennis Dunaway have been part of bands’ responsible for fifteen million albums sales and thirty gold and platinum records between them – yet a campaign run on the funding platform Indiegogo.com was still required to obtain fan donations that allowed the album to be completed and mixed in time for its summer 2013 release.

The fact Blue Coupe had to run a funding campaign to ensure completion of this album within their targeted time-frame says a lot more about the state of the music industry, where marketable commodity is more important than musical creativity, than it does about the quality of the finished product.

Because Million Miles More is a great little throwback record, but one that's injected with a fresh, quirky, creative musicality – melodic rock and roll with a twist.  

Flush The Fashion Review: Alice Cooper at Battersea Power Station live in Holographic 4D

Alice Cooper at Battersea Power Station live in Holographic 4D

The London landmark and star of Pink Floyd’s iconic ‘Animals’ record sleeve Battersea Power Station was home to an Alice Cooper concert with a difference last night…

Alice Cooper in Holographic 4D

Not one to hang around, Alice has skipped 3D and gone one better.. as in association with the very delicious 

Jägermeister

, Alice and his ORIGINAL band recorded a concert in LA that was then ‘beamed’ on stage in Holographic 4D in London.

Yes, that is correct, NOT 3D, 4!

Alice Cooper in 4D at Battersea review

The resulting effect, while great fun, was never going to quite match the hype. It was pretty cool though, sort of, you didn’t need glasses and was a glimpse of the future.

The band played a strictly old school set that opened with ‘

I’m Eighteen

‘ and included ‘

Be My Lover, Under My Wheels, Elected, No More Mister Nice Guy and Schools Out’

.

The new members to Rock N Roll’s Hall of Fame could have almost been in the room, (but they weren’t).

To the assembled hard-core Alice fans in attendance it didn’t really matter, they were just happy to be there and who could blame them.

Recent 

Kerrang

 Cover stars 

The Blues Kings

 kicked the event off with youthful exuberance and were good too.

Radio 1 DJ 

Zane Lowe

 kept the party flowing with a set energetic enough to get incite even the most inebriated in attendance to ‘

wave their hands in the air like they just don’t care

‘. Although by this point some of the legs were starting to wobble too..

Combine all this with graffiti artists, video projections on the Power Station walls, and endless amounts of free Jägermeister on hand, the night was definitely one to remember.

What really came across for me though wasn’t the 4D, or the stunning backdrop, or the free drinks, or the beautiful waitresses… it was how good the original members of Alice Cooper (the band) sounded together.

The King Blues
Zane Lowe Battersea Power Station
Steve enjoying with the Jägermeister girls
Battersea Power Station

The Alice Cooper (band) has seen a long list of talented musicians since this line up went their separate ways many years ago, but such is the special chemistry between the writers of these iconic songs, seeing them perform together I came away from the evening thinking only about their music.

And what great music it was.

PS, If you want to have a very quick look at the 4D experience, I took a very quick few seconds on my camera. 

Watch it here

.

Alice Cooper Readies Mega-Box Set

Only a day after being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Alice Cooper is prepping a massive collectible for fans: a four-CD/one-DVD/double-vinyl box set capturing the band’s early shock rock years.

There are only some preliminary details about Old School 1964-1974, but here’s what we can tell you. It’s going to feature, across its four CDs, demos, live takes, spoken-word material and vintage advertisements; demos from the  School’s Out and Muscle of Love sessions are specifically mentioned, along with a live show from the Killer Tour in 1971. A DVD promises three hours of never-before-seen footage, while two vinyl discs provide the aforementioned Killer show of 1971 and a reproduction of Very Record S-001, a 1967 single by The Nazz (not to be confused with Todd Rundgren-fronted Nazz), which would shortly change its name to none other than Alice Cooper.

And like any good mega-box set nowadays, there’s plenty of enclosed swag, namely a 64-page hardback book featuring rare photos and liner notes by metal journalist Lonn Friend and a folder featuring reproductions of set lists, ticket stubs, tour programs and more. And, rather ingeniously, the whole thing is packed in a 12″ case shaped like a school desk.

The link in the second paragraph will take you to the pre-order page; it’ll be out in June. More details, including a full track list, will be posted as soon as they’re known.

Expanded and Remastered Music News Alice Cooper Readies Mega-Box Set

The Second Disc, March 15, 2011

Only a day after being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Alice Cooper is prepping a massive collectible for fans: a four-CD/one-DVD/double-vinyl box set capturing the band’s early shock rock years.

There are only some preliminary details about Old School 1964-1974, but here’s what we can tell you. It’s going to feature, across its four CDs, demos, live takes, spoken-word material and vintage advertisements; demos from the School’s Out and Muscle of Love sessions are specifically mentioned, along with a live show from the Killer Tour in 1971. A DVD promises three hours of never-before-seen footage, while two vinyl discs provide the aforementioned Killer show of 1971 and a reproduction of Very Record S-001, a 1967 single by The Nazz (not to be confused with Todd Rundgren-fronted Nazz), which would shortly change its name to none other than Alice Cooper.

And like any good mega-box set nowadays, there’s plenty of enclosed swag, namely a 64-page hardback book featuring rare photos and liner notes by metal journalist Lonn Friend and a folder featuring reproductions of set lists, ticket stubs, tour programs and more. And, rather ingeniously, the whole thing is packed in a 12″ case shaped like a school desk.

The link in the second paragraph will take you to the pre-order page; it’ll be out in June. More details, including a full track list, will be posted as soon as they’re known.